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General Education at NCC is a set of specified categories of courses that contribute to the development of an educated person: one who thinks clearly, communicates effectively, makes informed and thoughtful judgments, distinguishes among sets of values, displays an appreciation for learning, and applies knowledge to the understanding of the human experience.

At NCC, General Education is achieved by the completion of a distribution of courses designed to enable students to:

  1. Read and listen effectively;
  2. Speak and write clearly and persuasively;
  3. Think critically and creatively;
  4. Understand scientific methodology; reason quantitatively, and function in a technological environment;
  5. Develop personal, social, and aesthetic values through an understanding of culture, nature, self and society;
  6. Develop an understanding of and appreciation for behaviors that promote the good health of body and mind;
  7. Develop literacy and appreciation in the visual and performing arts.

The selection of General Education courses depends on the curriculum requirements for a degree. These courses are grouped within the following categories and are designated in the Course Descriptions section of this catalog with the corresponding codes. The complete list of courses is available on campus at the Academic Advisement Center and on the Advisement Center’s website. Each course viewed on Banner Self-Serve is also individually coded. Only those courses on the approved lists will satisfy the Nassau Community College general education requirements.

Communication Arts [COM]
English Composition [COMP]
Fine and Performing Arts [FAPA]
Humanities [HUM]
Literature [LIT]
Mathematics [MATH ] /Computer Science [CMPS]
Natural and Physical Sciences
Laboratory Science [LSCI] /Non-laboratory science [NSCI]
Physical Education [PED]
Social Science [SBS]
Culture and Diversity which include
Western Heritage [WESH]
Global Awareness and Non-Western Cultures [GLNW],
and Pluralism and Diversity [PLDI]

Interdisciplinary Courses: In recognition of the commonalities and interrelatedness among academic disciplines, general education categories contain several interdisciplinary course offerings that satisfy the requirements.

Communication Arts:
Communication Arts courses teach oral communication skills necessary to participate effectively in public and academic debates and discussions, prepare and present researched material, and formulate valid arguments, and prepare students for successful interpersonal interaction in the academic, social, and professional realms. These courses are designated with the code COM and may be selected from the courses of the Communications Department [COM 102, COM 103, COM 123, COM 202 only].

English Composition:
English Composition courses are designed to give students a critical awareness of written language. They enable students to produce clear, well-developed, well-organized grammatical writing and to interpret and analyze texts of various genres. These courses are designated with the code COMP and must be selected from the courses of the English Department [ENG 101, ENG 102, ENG 108, ENG 109 only].

Fine and Performing Arts:
Courses in Fine and Performing Arts develop aesthetic awareness by introducing students to the processes by which artists create, perform and/or evaluate works of art. They foster self- expression, understanding, and an appreciation of the arts within an historical, cultural, theoretical and critical context. These courses are designated with the code FAPA and may be selected from the courses in several departments as denoted in the Course Descriptions section of the catalog.

Humanities:
Humanities courses teach students to analyze and interpret texts, ideas, discourse systems, and the human values, traditions, and beliefs they reflect. These courses are designated with the code HUM and must be selected from the courses of the following departments: African American Studies [AFR 130, AFR 131, AFR 152, AFR 155, AFR 170, AFR 190, AFR 197 only], Art, Communications, English, Foreign Languages, Interdisciplinary Studies [MDC 102, MDC 130 only], Library, Music, Philosophy, Reading, Theatre/Dance.

Literature:
Literature courses focus on the study of written works produced or translated into English that embody the creative use of language for artistic or stylistic purposes. They express ideas of permanent or universal significance. These courses are designated with the code LIT and may be selected from the courses in several departments as denoted in the Course Descriptions section of the catalog.

Mathematics:
Courses that satisfy this requirement use mathematical or computer science models that employ numerical, verbal, graphical and analytical tools to strengthen quantitative skills and logical reasoning and enable students to address other disciplines. These courses are designated with the code MATH and must be selected from the courses of the Mathematics/Computer Science/Information Technology Department. One computer science course with the code CSC [CSC 104, CSC 120 or CSC 130 only] may be used to satisfy the second mathematics course requirement in specified degrees.

Natural and Physical Sciences:
Natural and Physical Science courses explore how phenomena are observed, understood and theoretically synthesized through study and the application of the scientific method. They provide students with an understanding of scientific terms, concepts, and theories as well as the ability to test hypotheses in the laboratory. Study in the sciences helps students develop scientific literacy necessary to understand an increasingly complex world. One non-laboratory science course may be used to satisfy the second science course requirement in specified degrees. These courses are designated with the code LSCI (laboratory science) or NSCI (non-laboratory science) and must be selected from the courses of the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Engineering/Physics/Technology, Physical Sciences, General Science Studies, Multidisciplinary Science, Allied Health Sciences [AHS 131, AHS 132 only].

Physical Education:
Physical Education courses develop cardiovascular and neuro- muscular skill, strength, endurance, flexibility and fitness. They emphasize improved overall conditioning as well as skills in team, individual, and leisure activities. These courses are designated with the code PED and must be selected from the courses of the following departments: Health/Physical Education/Recreation, Theatre/Dance [DAN 126 only].

In all degree programs requiring physical education activities courses, full-time day students (12 credits or more in the day session) must take 1/2 credit of physical education activities for each full-time semester of attendance, to a maximum of 2 credits. The following are exempt from this requirement:

  1. Veterans
  2. Students over 25 at first date of attendance
  3. Students over 30 at date of graduation.

Social Science:
Social Science courses investigate behavior in social contexts through analysis of the characteristics and structure of individuals, families, groups and institutions. They provide an understanding of the concepts, methods and models that social scientists use to explore social phenomena. History courses explore institutions and developments that have shaped human experience while providing a familiarity with the historical narrative. These courses are designated with the code SBS and must be selected from the courses of the following departments: African American Studies [AFR history classes and AFR 185 only], Economics/Finance, History/Political Science/Geography, Interdisciplinary Global Studies, Psychology, Sociology/ Anthropology/Social Work .

Culture and Diversity:
This includes the three subcategories of Western Heritage, Global Awareness and Non-Western Cultures, and Pluralism and Diversity. Appropriate courses in other categories may be used to satisfy requirements in any of these three subcategories.

Western Heritage:
Western Heritage courses reflect the distinctive characteristics of western heritage presented in a broad context. They acquaint students with the evolution of western culture and values and relate them to other regions and cultures. These courses are designated with the code WESH and may be selected from the courses in several departments as denoted in the Course Descriptions section of the catalog.

Global Awareness and Non-Western Cultures:
Course s in Global Awareness and Non-Western Cultures examine and foster an appreciation of cultural traditions other than European and North American. They enhance recognition of the diversity and similarities of the ways in which people in different cultural traditions perceive and experience their lives. These courses are designated with the code GLNW and may be selected from the courses in several departments as denoted in the Course Descriptions section of the catalog.

Pluralism and Diversity:
Courses in Pluralism and Diversity expand understanding of the various influences that shape perspectives, values, and identities. They explore social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and racial formations in a pluralistic nation and world. These courses are designated with the code PLDI and may be selected from the courses in several departments as denoted in the Course Descriptions section of the catalog.